Winter Tree Care Checklist

You know how to handle the cold season, but is winter tree care on your radar?

By this point in the winter season, many of us feel like we’ve got it all figured out. We’ve worked out the snow removal kinks, have all our firewood in, and know how to keep our family and animals cozy and safe. But what about winter tree care? Has that crossed your mind?

winter tree care

If you’re like most people, unless you’re dealing with broken limbs, probably not.

So, what does winter tree care involve? Thankfully, there’s not much to it, but these few key points are important.

Root protection
The first consideration for roots is insulation. In the Sandpoint area, this is usually not a problem. We get enough snow to insulate roots from cold temperatures. However, it’s still not a bad idea to mulch around the base of your trees for added protection. After the snow melts, get ready for next winter by spreading a two-to-four-inch layer of mulch around the base of your tree, under the canopy. Just be sure to keep mulch away from the trunk.

The other consideration for roots that is an issue in Sandpoint is the use of road salt. This can cause discoloration of foliage in evergreens and bark dieback in all trees. In the long term, it can lead to systemic issues caused by the preponderance of salt in the soil. Several options exist to remediate this issue:

  • Use calcium chloride instead of sodium chloride. It’s more expensive but less harmful to plants. And when you consider the cost of a hazard tree removal, it may be more cost effective in the end.
  • Furthermore, you can mix your road salt with sand for added traction and to lessen the amount of salt used.
  • Extra watering of roadside trees can dilute the amount of salt present on the trees and in the soil.
  • Finally, apply gypsum in late fall, before snow comes, to protect roots.

Trunk protection
Especially on young trees, thin bark is a vulnerability. Deer can do damage by rubbing their antlers on the trunk. Rodents can tunnel through the snow and chew the bark. And even temperature swings can do damage, warming the trunk on a sunny day, only to freeze hard at night, damaging a vascular system that got excited about spring. An easy winter tree care solution to these problems is to wrap the trunks—from the base to the lowest branches—with plastic tree guard. This is especially important for young maple, ash, linden, locust, dogwood, cherry, birch, and crabapple trees.

Branch protection
The best protection for branches is maintenance pruning. This ensures that broken and diseased branches are removed before the snow does it for you. At this point in the season, though, proactive care can include gently removing snow from drooping branches to prevent them from breaking. Do this with a broom rather than by shaking the limb so as not to harm the branch. Also, try to keep from piling snow against your tree, trapping low branches in the process. And finally, if you notice ice covering your tree, leave it. Let it melt and then inspect for damage. Trying to remove ice yourself will likely cause more harm.

With these few tips in mind, your tree should easily weather the winter. Come spring, if you notice any damage from the cold season, call us. We’re happy to assess your tree’s health and suggest any corrective action it might require.